leadership

Nousha Bayrami headshot in black and white

Nousha Bayrami

Nousha joins the movement as a fellow spoonie (disabled person) committed to community building as the result of a passion for justice and equity.

“I believe this work depends upon not only the inclusion, but the leadership of disabled people, particularly those facing multiple barriers due to discrimination of other identities,” says Nousha.

Nousha joins the movement as a fellow spoonie (disabled person) committed to community building as the result of a passion for justice and equity.

Having dedicated well over a decade in the non-profit world, Nousha has worked with and alongside women, youth and QTIBIPoC who identify as neurodivergent, drug users, sex workers, with experiences of poverty, gender-based violence, and institutionalization. They are a fervent believer that agency comes from solidarity and the sharing of knowledge and skills. Feeling there was more they could do to contribute to meaningful change, Nousha shifted their focus from direct services to policy related work for structural change. They are a proud member of the Lived Experience Experts Group with Health Justice, currently working to reshape BC’s Mental Health Act.

“Access to basic needs and human rights are the bare minimum. Everyone deserves to live with dignity and respect. It’s time disabled people are included and prioritized. This is just the beginning, there’s so much more to come.”

Nousha is grateful to live on the lands of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm(Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and Sel̓íl̓witulh(Tsleil-Waututh) Nations of the Coast Salish people, colonially known as Vancouver’s North Shore. They cohabitate with their older dog Mishky who is also disabled. Nousha holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of British Columbia. They’re a lover of plants who has too many books on the go at once.